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Ice flood kills at least 9 climbers at Manaslu peak trail in Nepal

kooza ice flood_0
kooza ice flood_0
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KATHMANDU, Nepal – A massive avalanche hit a team of climbing group of French, Germans, and Italians who were reportedly near the top of Manaslu Peak also known as Kutang.

KATHMANDU, Nepal – A massive avalanche hit a team of climbing group of French, Germans, and Italians who were reportedly near the top of Manaslu Peak also known as Kutang. This peak is the eighth highest mountain in the world. At least 9 are buried in snow.

According to initial details given by the thekooza.com, the cause of this disaster was the choice of a bad time for the climb, because the rainy season is not over and ice floods are a regular feature during September and October in this range of the peaks. The officials of Nepal also confirmed the cayuse mentioned by thekooza.com and Laxmi Dhakal, head of the home ministry’s disaster response division, who added that the avalanche hit camp three of the Manaslu peak located at 7,000 meters resulting in a flood of snow.”

According to the Disaster Response Ministry, it is feared that at least 9 climbers, including a German and a local guide, have been killed after they were buried by an avalanche on one of the world’s most deadly mountains. Thirteen climbers have been rescued alive, of whom 5 have been airlifted to Kathmandu for treatment.

Manaslu, at 8,156 meters (26,759 feet) above mean sea level is the highest peak in the Lamjung District and is located about forty miles east of Annapurna. The mountain’s long ridges and valley glaciers offer feasible approaches from all directions and culminate in a peak that towers steeply above its surrounding landscape and is a dominant feature when viewed from afar. The popular Manaslu trekking route of 177 kilometers (110 miles), skirts the Manaslu massif over the pass down to Annapurna. The Nepalese government only permitted trekking of this circuit in 1991. The trekking trail follows an ancient salt-trading route along the Budhi Gandaki river.

About the author

editor

Editor in chief for eTurboNew is Linda Hohnholz. She is based in the eTN HQ in Honolulu, Hawaii.